Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe

Which neatly sums up the quiet little Jam Session that took place last Sunday. Plenty of opportunity to gyre and gimble, and none missed. A smaller bunch of jammers than usual (17) concocted a variety of tempo, and tones. And then had them altered at random.

All of which made for the usual gossip-mongering over a refreshing social lubricant, munchies from Glen, and the early departure of several rather good musos.

And the orchestra played on… Continue reading →

Jam Session 1.01: start here…

Winter already. Time to burn the furniture, and race to the back bar of the Ludicrous Arms. Some may claim to have been lost, others would have walked into the Leinster under their own steam. Whatever, another pleasantly diversionary jam session was in prospect, with about six saxophones to one of anything else.

As it should be… Yet again, the assembled incognoscenti failed to recognise the full Garrett protocol, which, as an opening gambit, leaves little to be desired, and even less to speculate upon. The good Captain, dispensing with such dreary conventions as following the form, conducted a lively rampage through Morning, or at least parts of it, before L Savage tackled Yesterdays, beating it also to a satisfying pulp. Noel confounded the Captain by playing well in tune; and Paul, Gentleman JC and the troops threatened real music for a while, before descending to the level to which the rest of us aspire.

Several peeps, Chaos one of them, remarked on the lack of competent singers. Others remarked upon the lack of competent anything, and were it not for the fact that we were all having a good time, one might have been tempted to call the whole enterprise something of a schemozzle.

I must own up to staying until less than stumps, pleading exhaustion and a surfeit of pills. A fun afternoon, nothing got broken and nobody died.

And the band played on – ’til well past the hour.
TW

From Geoff Woollan

Could the jams be streamed live from the Lunatic Soup Lounge so those of us a little further away could listen as well ?

As for criticism, clearly non-existent management is doing something right as the definition of bad management is being unable to organise a piss-up in a brewery. It would seem that the products of the brewery are an important part of the technique.

GW as opposed to TW from 10,000 + miles away

JAZZ GENRES EXPLAINED

It is high time someone explained the different genres in Jazz. Meanwhile…

THE BLUES  Probably the most basic influence on jazz, comprised of no more than three chords and the perfidy of women. All of it sung with a fake sincerity, often in a fake American accent to make it sound authentic. Apparently.

JAZZ STANDARDS The term is an ironic one, describing the constitutional inability of your average muso to play the same thing twice. There are actually few standards amongst Jazz Musicians, and all of them are low.

Jazz standards use four or even five chords, and were written some time between 1933 and1948, a time when most sensible people would be staying home to watch the advertisements on pay TV. The genre is defined by the use of walking tenths in the bass line, or staggering quarters if the bottleshop will still give you credit; and by the soloist swinging – preferably from a rope attached to the rafters, but I digress.

BEBOP  Another ironic term, describing the constitutional inability of your average bebop muso to play the same thing once. If you slow it down and play Bebop backwards, it doesn’t sound any worse. Spooky, or what!

POST BEBOP  This genre cannot be called ironic at all, as most adherents struggle with words of more than one syllable. It does not refer to jazz music that has been learnt by mail order. No one has ever listened to the end of a post bebop composition – because it doesn’t have one, it just fades away when the jazz club goes broke.

FREE JAZZ  Jazz that is so dissonant and repetitive that no one will pay for it. The entire enrolment of University Jazz Courses is said to be working on extending this to the point where people will pay for it (on condition that it stops immediately.) If successful, they will be able to go and get a job teaching trombone in a High School one year earlier than the previous intake (see note below). Progress is a wondrous thing.

SHOWTUNES  Ah, the most sublime music of all – saccharine romantic ballads. Showtunes have a timeless quality, at least when played by the Jammers, and we only pick them to see if we can get Colonel T off the stage.

Footnote: The enrolment at a University is called an intake. Each year around Melbourne about 100 Students are taken in by Jazz courses. Only to discover that there are no jobs at the end of it, other than teaching trombone in a High School. Far better to have studied Accounting or Quantity Surveying. There are no jobs in those disciplines either, but at least the pay is better.

Some More Jam Session Terms explained

Part of an ongoing series of one.

Soloist: Can only play one instrument at a time, often quite badly. If talking to a soloist, make sure that you speak clearly, as they are often not good listeners, due to lack of practice. On no account should you mention the presence of a rhythm section, as this might startle them.

Saxophonist: a sub set of soloist. They cannot all put five beats to the bar in a 4/4 tune, but most of them are pretty good at it. Continue reading →

Jam Session News: Getting better, or trying or something… and another week in the salt mines to follow…

There are many, many Jam Sessions which are carefully planned, scrupulously organised and meticulously focussed on, generally, “modern” jazz, which, for reasons which escape me, means jazz first performed by African American heroin addicts some time between 1954 and about 1966, and slavishly copied by middle class kids in Jazz courses the world over ever since. Continue reading →

At The Leinster

The Jam Session: Another record established

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It would have seemed, by 5.00, that we were going to approach the record for most musicians performing on a single afternoon (31, a couple of years ago). We stopped short at 26, as it turned out, but another record was undoubtedly broken…

The All time Great Train Wreck:

Yup, Good Morning Heartache wasn’t good, and the heartache stopped mercifully short with various mutterings about a dodgy chart.. take a bow, Captain Chaos, Sir Roger C, Doug Haircut Kuhn, the Debonair John Curtis, and the others. Magnificent shambles, really, really well done…

Only to be followed, the very next toon, by an even bigger cock-up on Mas Que Nada, same culprits, admittedly a tune well designed for upwards cocking, again cut mercifully short: an absolute debacle, and the audience, vicious bastards, lapped it up.

So the record is for two train wrecks in a row, a feat often attempted but never quite realised in the past.

The Haircut plays Mas Que Nada about once every two weeks, with Katerina, so he may be excused. Sir Roger De Coverley made up for it with a fine set with Rory C. later on. Paul Phillips thinks I have forgotten he was playing, I haven’t, but as he only hits things and didn’t have a chart, he may be exempted from the blame. Actually, he subsequently played rather well…

All of which left precious little time for a roll call of hopefuls to plink, thwack, slap, fernottle and gargle their way through a dizzying array of Jazz standards later on. The session ended fairly late, due to the following:

· Sebastien (drums)
· Andy Moon (dbl bass)
· Anton (single bass)
· Gerard (drums, and then piano)
· Gary (drums)
· Tony (sax)
· Soozie (vocals)
· Sonia (chanteuse)
· Marita (ditto)
· Don (piano)
· John Calamatta (sax and red beret)
· Chrissie Manetta (tonsils)
· Bruce (drums)
· Paul Phillips (drums)
· Chico (guitar)
· Kevin (vocals)
· Tom (guitar)
· Grant (sax and floot)
· Alex (drums)
· Alex’s dad (piano)
· Stuart (vocals)
· Gentleman John C (piano)
· Rory Clark (piano)
· Sir Roger De Coverley (sax)
· Captain Chaos (sax and confusion)

…and one other who was so talented, young, and good looking that I have neglected to mention their name. You know who you are!
TW