Jazz At The Leinster?

Good grief, whatever next…

The Captain writes:

Sunday at the Leinster saw the return after many months of the mercurial Julian Driscoll on Flugal Horn and the appearance of newcomers Casey (Trumpet) and Matt (Bass). Noel,, Tony and moi on Tenors. John, Don and Bob on the keyboard. Ben and Elliot guitars, Doug also on Bass and drums from Glen, Spike Bruce and Anne.  Vocals from Debbie Chris and Stewart. Overall some very fine Jazz was performed

Not your usual correspondent

 

Less-Money-Mo-Music-Lots-Problems

For those of you who either cannot sleep, play 3rd trombone in Rimsky Korsakov’s Piano Concerto in C#minor, or are remotely interested in the future of the music “business”, here is an extremely well researched article worth a read…thought provoking stuff on the changes in CD sales, streaming music services, concert revenues and the like.

. . . more info

The Laika Bar: Grumpy B Comes Out to Listen . . .

Friday night, the impeccable Miss Katerina Myskova, with meself, Doug “haircut” Kuhn and, if he answers the phone in time, Captain Chaos himself. Miss K wowed ém at Dizzy’s last Friday and has condescended to slum it with us mere mortals once more – actually, she jumped at the chance.

Last Friday, Jen Salisbury hopped in as the booked singer called in sick, and despite Grumpy Boris’ initial reservations put in 2 hours of up tempo jazz, swing and blues, without batting an eyelid. Marvellous attitude, great singing and came up smiling. The goods! Boris was so impressed he ungrumped himself and asked for her again. Stay tuned…

Props to the Captain who sat in for a coupla numbers, but stayed and played all night, at tempos that would make a maiden blush; and to “Twang” Stewart on guitar for some great solos.

Katerina Myskova and the boys from 8.00pm Friday 31st July at The Laika Bar, 9 Fitzroy Street, St Kilda,

Aust Jazz Museum

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We all know that jazz in Australia is alive and well! Great musos all over the country, lots of talented youngsters graduating from colleges and universities every year, clubs, pubs, festivals…

But what about our jazz history? The great post-war jazz blooming of the Bells, Graeme and Roger, Ade, Graeme Coyle, Bob Barnard, and more. Some of the great gigs of all time were recorded on tape and acetate, and you know what happens to them over time: they disintegrate. Continue reading →